On This Day, March 12: Kidnapped teen Elizabeth Smart found alive in Utah


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Elizabeth Smart attends a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 30, 2003. On March 12, 2003, Smart, who had been kidnapped from her Salt Lake City home in June 2002, was found. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI

Elizabeth Smart attends a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 30, 2003. On March 12, 2003, Smart, who had been kidnapped from her Salt Lake City home in June 2002, was found. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI | License Photo

March 12 (UPI) — On this date in history:

In 1912, Juliette Gordon Low organized the first Girl Scouts of America troop in Savannah, Ga.

In 1933, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made the first of his Sunday evening “fireside chats” — informal radio addresses from the White House to the American people. The first address explained why he recently ordered a bank holiday.

In 1938, Nazi Germany invaded and occupied Austria.

In 1947, in a speech to Congress, U.S. President Harry Truman outlined what became known as the Truman Doctrine, calling for U.S. aid to countries threatened by communist revolution.

In 1993, more than 250 people were killed and at least 700 injured in 13 coordinated terrorist bombings in Mumbai.

In 1994, the Church of England ordained its first female priests.

In 1999, former Soviet allies Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic joined NATO.

File Photo by Toms Kalnins/EPA-EFE

In 2003, Elizabeth Smart, 15, who had been kidnapped from her Salt Lake City home in June 2002, was found in the custody of a panhandler and his wife in nearby Sandy, Utah.

In 2008, New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer resigned after being caught in a high-priced prostitution scandal.

In 2018, a Bangladeshi passenger plane — a Bombardier Dash 8 Q400 — crashed at Kathmandu International Airport in Nepal, killing 49 people.

In 2019, dozens of parents and college officials — including actors Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman — were charged in a college admissions scandal in which parents paid bribes to help their children get into college.

In 2020, the NHL paused its season, and the NCAA canceled its men’s and women’s tournaments as COVID-19 spread throughout the United States.

In 2022, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced it would end the use of a Trump-era policy, called Title 42, as it pertains to turning away unaccompanied migrant children at the border.

File Photo by Ariana Drehsler/UPI



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